Wireless LAN bridge

We are preparing to move 40 staff to an office building a couple of miles from the church. For the last several years those staff have worked out of a temporary building for which the temporary use permit is now expiring. So how do you connect 40 remote staff to your LAN? If you have a clear line-of-sight, a great option is to use a wireless LAN bridge.

Here are pictures taken yesterday as our vendor performed alignment of the integrated radio/antenna units. These are 80 GHz (millimeter wave) radios that are capable of 1 Gb/s full-duplex, but we got the version that is rate-limted to 100 Mb/s.

Radio on roof of office building, pointed towards the church. The steel wall in front is a “penthouse” that hides roof-top air handlers an other equipment. The mast is mounted to steel girders supporting the penthouse.

Close up of back of radio with volt meter showing signal strength.
Looking over the top of the radio toward the church building, 1.7 miles away.

Close up taken from the office building with black arrow showing the location of the radio on the roof of the church building.

Radio on roof of church building. The mast is held by a 4-point mount and weighed down by concrete blocks so roof penetration isn’t required. This location was chosen for maximum wind protection (air handling unit to the right; roof parapet to the left). It also happens to be right next to a roof access hatch.

Ian (our network admin) with his shiny new radio!

Jay, the lead installer for our vendor, tweaks the alignment by turning nuts on the mount while looking at his volt meter.

Jay relays meter readings to his co-worker on the roof of the other building.

On this end the radio is connected by fiber.

Close up taken from the church building with white arrow showing the location of the radio on the roof of the office building.

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